Andy Griffith
1964 Ford Galaxie

Signatures of the actors adorn this authentic car from the Andy Griffith TV series: Don Knotts - Barney Fife, Betty Lynn - Thelma Lou (Barney Fife's girlfriend), Howard Morris - Ernest T. Bass, George Lindsey - Goober, and Jean Carson - Daphne (one of the "fun girls"). The Andy Griffith Show is an American sitcom first televised by CBS between October 3, 1960, and April 1, 1968. Andy Griffith portrays a widowed sheriff in the fictional small community of Mayberry, North Carolina. His life is complicated by an inept but well-meaning deputy, Barney Fife (Don Knotts), a spinster aunt and housekeeper, Aunt Bee (Frances Bavier), and a young son, Opie (Ron Howard, billed as Ronny). Local ne'er-do-wells, bumbling pals, and temperamental girlfriends further complicate his life. The series was a major hit, never placing lower than seventh in the Nielsen ratings and ending its final season at number one. It has been ranked by TV Guide as the 9th-best show in television history. Though neither Griffith nor the show won awards during its eight-season run, series co-stars Knotts and Bavier accumulated a combined total of six Emmy Awards. The show, a semi-spin-off from an episode of The Danny Thomas Show titled "Danny Meets Andy Griffith", spawned its own spin-off series, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. (1964), a sequel series, Mayberry R.F.D. (1968), and a reunion telemovie, Return to Mayberry (1986). The show's enduring popularity has generated a good deal of show-related merchandise.

Sanford & Son - 1950 Mercury Pickup & The Actual Set From The TV Show

Sanford and Son stars Redd Foxx as Fred G. Sanford, a 65-year-old widower and junk dealer living at 9114 S. Central Ave. in the Watts neighborhood of South Central Los Angeles, California; alongside Demond Wilson as his 30-year-old son, Lamont Sanford. In his youth, Fred moved to South Central Los Angeles from his hometown of St. Louis. On the show's premiere in 1972, newspaper ads touted Foxx as NBC's answer to Archie Bunker, the bigoted white protagonist of All in the Family.

 
  

 
  
All in the Family

All in the Family is an American sitcom that was originally broadcast on the CBS television network from January 12, 1971, to April 8, 1979. In September 1979, a new show, Archie Bunker's Place, picked up where All in the Family had ended. This sitcom lasted another four years, ending its run in 1983. Produced by Norman Lear and Bud Yorkin, it is based on the British television comedy series Till Death Us Do Part. Despite being considerably softer in its approach than its BBC predecessor, the show broke ground in its depiction of issues previously considered unsuitable for U.S. network television comedy, such as racism, homosexuality, women's liberation, rape, miscarriage, abortion, breast cancer, the Vietnam War, menopause, and impotence. The show ranked number-one in the yearly Nielsen ratings from 1971 to 1976.
Star Trek

Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment franchise created by Gene Roddenberry. The core of Star Trek is its six television series: The Original Series, The Animated Series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager, and Enterprise. The franchise also includes eleven feature films, dozens of games, hundreds of novels, numerous toy lines and replicas. Beginning with the original television series and continuing with the subsequent films and series, the franchise has become a cult phenomenon, initiated the creation of the full-fledged language Klingon, and spawned many pop culture references.

 

 
M*A*S*H

M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, adapted from the 1970 feature film MASH (which was itself based on the 1968 novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors, by Richard Hooker). The series is a medical drama and a black comedy that was produced in association with 20th Century Fox Television for CBS. It follows a team of doctors and support staff stationed at the "4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital" in Uijeongbu, South Korea, during the Korean War.
Happy Days & Larverne and Shirley

Set in the Midwestern city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Happy Days revolves around teenager Richie Cunningham (Ron Howard) and his family: his father, Howard (Tom Bosley), who owns a hardware store; traditional homemaker mother Marion (Marion Ross); younger sister Joanie (Erin Moran); and high school dropout, biker and suave ladies man Arthur "Fonzie"/"The Fonz" Fonzarelli (Henry Winkler), who would eventually become the Cunninghams' upstairs tenant. The earlier episodes revolve around Richie and his friends, Warren "Potsie" Weber (Anson Williams) and Ralph Malph (Donny Most), with Fonzarelli as a secondary character. As the series progressed, Fonzarelli proved to be a favorite with viewers and soon more story lines were written to reflect his growing popularity. Fonzie befriends Richie and the Cunningham family, and when Richie (Ron Howard) left the series for military service, Winkler's Fonzie became the central figure of the show. In later seasons, other characters were introduced including Fonzie's young cousin, Charles "Chachi" Arcola (Scott Baio), who became a love interest for Joanie Cunningham.

 

 
Hollywood

Starting from the LEFT: Steven Seagal, Danny DeVito, Michael Douglas, Paul Hogan, Bruce Willis, and Jay Leno.
The Madson Power Blaster

One of the crazy contraptions created from the mind of The Car in The Tree Guy, Mark Madson.

 

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