ROOMS OF THE WHITE HOUSE  |  PRESIDENTIAL COLLECTION  |  WHITE HOUSE FURNITURE  |  CLOCKS
Below: A jacket from
President Ronald Reagan
Above: The pen used to sign the Social Security amendment of 1983. When the federal government created Social Security, all federal employees, including the President and members of Congress, were exempt from having to pay the Social Security tax, and they received no Social Security benefits. This law was changed by the Social Security Amendments of 1983, which brought within the Social Security system all members of Congress, the President and the Vice President, federal judges, and certain executive-level political appointees, as well as all federal employees hired in any capacity on or after January 1, 1984.
Above: A hand-crafted walking stick used by President Benjamin Harrison.

ABOVE: These gloves were placed on President
Eisenhower's casket by his wife Mamie.

ABOVE: Two dresses from
First Lady Rosalynn Carter

ABOVE: This suit and dresses are from President Richard Nixon and wife Pat Nixon. Also pictured is
Pat Nixon's hat from an African safari as well as a telephone and directory from the White House

ABOVE: Two dresses are from the wardrobe of First Lady Ladybird Johnson. The items on the shelf are personal belongings of President Lyndon
Johnson and his wife Ladybird. They include some gloves, eyeglasses, watches, and a couple of the President's prized hats he was so famous for.

ABOVE: Lydon B. Johnson's Suit

ABOVE: A piece of wood taken from George Washingtons casket.

ABOVE: A life mask of Rutherford B. Hayes

ABOVE: A life mask of George Washington

ABOVE: Grace Coolidge's Rose Chiffon Stole
Lucretia R. Garfield Mourning Dress

Owned & worn by the first lady during her husband’s funeral. The assassination of President James A. Garfield took place in Washington, D.C. on July 2, 1881. Garfield was shot by Charles J. Guiteau at 9:30 am, less than four months into Garfield's term as the 20th President of the United States. Garfield died eleven weeks later on September 19, 1881, the second of four Presidents to be assassinated, following Abraham Lincoln and preceding William McKinley and John F. Kennedy. His Vice President, Chester A. Arthur, succeeded Garfield as President. Garfield also lived the longest after the shooting, compared to other Presidents. Lincoln and Kennedy died soon after being shot, and McKinley died a week later.

ROOMS OF THE WHITE HOUSE  |  PRESIDENTIAL COLLECTION  |  WHITE HOUSE FURNITURE  |  CLOCKS
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